CIC CIO Tech Forum 2015: Creating a Collaborative Foundation for IT

Got to go to University of Iowa for the 2015 CIC CIO Tech Forum. My part of the presentation was on how we took qualitative research methods and paired them with agile development methods in order to make rapid and significant improvements to a service that serves about two dozen of the three dozen IT service providers on University of Michigan campuses.

The official abstract:
Creating a Collaborative Foundation for IT
The University of Michigan’s IT Strategic Plan envisions effective collaboration amongst the 35 IT service providers on campus. Campus IT asked for enterprise-calibre Service Management platform without enterprise-calibre complexity. We responded with the IT Service Provider Toolkit. This presentation will provide an overview of the approach used to define, build and deliver Service Management concepts in a straightforward and simple approach.

Our mantra from the very beginning has been, “keep it simple,” or as it is now known, “tickets without complexity.” We will describe our approach to rapid requirements-gathering and development that allowed us to deliver the initial “base package” within 120 days and supports onboarding new units in under 100 hours of effort. We will discuss the longer-term view of where this is headed, as well as how we think this supports upcoming changes in managing the IT landscape (such as BYOD).

Fostering a collaborative environment across the diverse culture and IT needs in a higher education atmosphere has its challenges. We will share some of what we learned and how creating the idea that each unit, school or college is an IT Service Provider among a community of peers opened new ways of thinking about old problems.

It's no Wolverine, but... :)


Educause Connect San Antonio 2015

Spent some time in San Antonio for one of the Educause Connect conferences.

The room before it was filled.

Co-facilitated a great conversation with IT professionals in Higher Ed about how your relationship with technology changes everything. We explored how viewing technology from a deterministic or a constructivist perspective could change your outlook on how you'd approach common IT management issues. We also talked about how that might shape the ability to be a service provider rather than simply a technology provider.

View from one of the paths in San Antonio

 The famous Riverwalk in San Antonio
View from one of the paths farther out of downtown San Antonio


New Article Published: The Role of Organizational Maturity in Process Adoption

A new article, with co-author, Rachel Apgar, has been published, here.

When trying to get an organization to adopt a process, such as IT capacity management, the maturity of that organization is a mediating factor that can either limit or contribute to the success of the effort. Regardless of whether you’re implementing an ITIL version of capacity management, a process an author recommends, or a capacity management process of your own design, the maturity of the organization adopting it needs to be kept in mind.


LinkedIn Social Network Visualization

LinkedIn Labs just posted a pretty neat mapping tool that shows you your network. As you can see I have a pretty big set of people (orange) at work and another set of people in Academia (blue) and then friends in between. This isn't much of a surprise, but some of the stray connections between these worlds surprised me. Very quickly I was able to identify a handful of people who I never knew knew each other. It truly is a small world out there.


New Article Published in MeasureIT

MeasureIT has just published an article I wrote, titled "Describing IT Capacity Management: A Call for Action".


IT capacity management has an abundance of literature on best practices and advice, but a paucity of literature describing how its processes practiced. This article is a call for action. It is a call for qualitative and descriptive research inquiries into how IT capacity management processes are implemented and practiced.


New Article Published in Journal of Computer Resource Management

The Journal of Computer Resource Management has just published an article I wrote, called "Can Cloud Storage Providers Mine Your Intellectual Property (and Get Away With It)?". It looks at copyright law, end user license agreements and case history to conclude that, yes, they can do it and get away with it.


"This paper explores the possibilities for data mining practices on intellectual property rights by cloud storage service providers. It examines copyright law, the end user license agreements of three popular cloud storage providers, and case history to draw the conclusion that storage service providers can mine intellectual property and get away with it."


Jeff Jarvis has an interesting idea he calls the 'reverse meter', where you place an emphasis on the value of the relationship with the person who is the 'customer'. An online social marketing friend of mine seemed to think the idea was novel, but that implementation could be complex. As with most things, the devil is in the details.